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Ladies And Gentleman, Say Hello To Your New Favorite Lunch: The Hamdog

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Forget the debate about whether or not a hotdog is also a sandwich; that’s old hat in comparison to the new form the hot dog has now taken on.

Have you ever found yourself in a situation where you were torn? Torn between indulging in a burger or a hot dog for lunch?

Well, worry not, indecisive diners, because a man in Perth, Australia, named Mark Murray has created a solution for you: the Hamdog.

Per Metro, the Hamdog is a super intense looking hamburger-hotdog hybrid, and is now the world’s only patented burger which is currently being rolled out across Australia at large.

Apparently, Murray actually dreamt up the chimera in 2004, but only began offering his unique brainchild to the world two months ago; his venture has been a great success.

Each Hamdog costs $6, and consists of a frankfurter placed between two halves of a beef patty — yes, you read that correctly — and then topped with cheese, pickles, lettuce, tomato, American mustard, ketchup, and mayonnaise. Then, all of those ingredients are tucked snugly inside a meticulously designed Hamdog bun (think normal burger bun, only with the addition of hot dog bun ends attached).

All of the Hamdog ingredients are locally sourced from Western Australia, excluding the American-sourced pickles.

#HamDog Haaaaaaaaaaamdaaaaaaaaaaawg!!!

A photo posted by Peazy (@slapfunk) on

“We’ve had requests of all sorts for gluten free, vegan and vegetarian Hamdogs,” Mark told News.com.au. “Once the product is out there and that process is sorted, we’ll start experimenting.”

At the moment, the most intricate detail that goes into the Hamdog is the bun: Each one apparently has to be assembled by hand, which is no doubt an extremely time-consuming process — especially if demand increases. Murray is currently looking to find a way to semi-automate the process.

Interested in helping him out? The Hamdog is patented both in America and Australia, so you can’t bring the idea over stateside. However, if you want to get involved in the business, you are welcome to purchase a franchise for approximately $7,500, and try to help production get moving along.

Bon appetit!

Sources: Metro, News.com.au / Photo credit: Three Foodie Sisters Australia/Instagram

Tags: food hybrid, hamburger, hamdog, Hot Dog
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Why McDonald’s Burgers Don’t Rot: It’s Not What You Think

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It is well known that McDonald’s burgers can sit out for years without showing signs of decomposition.

This ominous phenomenon is well documented, and a quick Google search will show countless old burgers, even one from 1996, Business Insider reports.

One Nebraska chiropractor’s office proudly displays a nearly intact McDonald’s Happy Meal that is a few years old in an attempt to keep patients away from fast food:

Dan Whipple of Utah has a burger from 1999 that still has not rotted:

Whipple originally forgot about the burger for a couple years and found intact. He now reportedly shows it to his grandchildren to impress upon them just how many chemicals and preservatives are in fast food.

But according to McDonald’s Canada, the burgers “do rot under certain conditions,” Dr. Keith Warriner wrote on the franchise’s official website.

Essentially, the microbes that cause rotting are a lot like ourselves, in that they need water, nutrients, warmth and time to grow. If we take one or more of these elements away, then microbes cannot grow or spoil food.

In the example of a McDonald’s hamburger, the patty loses water in the form of steam during the cooking process. The bun, of course, is made out of bread. Toasting it reduces the amount of moisture. This means that after preparation, the hamburger is fairly dry. When left out open in the room, there is further water loss as the humidity within most buildings is around 40%. So in the absence of moisture or high humidity, the hamburger simply dries out, rather than rot.

Warriner went on to suggest that a similar homemade burger would not rot either.

He is right.

To test this out, food blog A Hamburger Today experimented with several kinds of McDonald’s and homemade burgers. Like the McDonald’s burgers, the homemade ones with similar dimensions did not rot, while a larger homemade burger and a McDonald’s Quarter Pounder both did, leading AHT to conclude that the small, flat surface area of the smaller burgers allow them to completely dehydrate before mold has the opportunity to grow.

Sources: Business Insider (2), McDonald's, A Hamburger Today / Photo Credit: Business InsiderA Hamburger Today (2)

Tags: burger, doesn't rot, hamburger, mcdonald's, preservatives
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