What Happens To All Those Record-Breaking Giant Foods?

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By Cooking Panda

Have you ever seen an article about some massive, record-breaking food, thought it was pretty amusing for two seconds, and then wondered what on earth happened to that enormous quantity of food? You are not alone.

In fact, it’s one of the most asked questions posed to Guinness World Records, according to Today I Found Out. It’s good to know that those of us who are fond of browsing the internet’s vast selection of stories about giant pizzas and colossal ice cream cones do, in fact, have an active environmental conscience.

Luckily, people like us can sleep soundly at night knowing that Guinness does indeed have an anti-waste policy regarding gigantic amounts of food. In order for such records to be officially recognized, the food must be consumed or distributed for consumption, the Guinness website details.

The handy stipulation prevents perfectly good — and often tasty — food from going to waste. And if companies choose to sell their massive foods, it also allows them to earn back some of the money they spend on the expensive publicity stunts. 

In other cases, the rule isn’t so effective at stopping food squandering.

Since record-breaking foods have to be edible in order to earn a Guinness title, foods that are deemed unsafe to eat may be ineligible, no matter their size. Organizers of an attempt to make the world’s largest bowl of fried rice learned that the hard way when they were disqualified for their inedible dish, which a video showed had been stepped upon by several of the volunteers as they shoveled it into a dump truck, according to Huffington Post. The organizers were criticized for wasting food, though they claimed it was used as pig feed.

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Luckily, most attempts at cooking record-breaking foods seem to lead to very full bellies. When The Rock made the world’s largest seven-layer chip dip, for example, the fish tank of 540 pounds of refried beans, sour cream, cheese, guacamole, tomatoes, green onions and black olives was donated to a homeless shelter. 

Want to set out to create your own Guinness-worthy dish? As long as it’s safe for consumption and you send it to me so I may consume it, you have official approval.

Sources: Today I Found Out, The Huffington Post / Photo credit: U.S. Department of Defense

Tags: food waste, giant foods, Guinness World Records
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