Salt And Straw Is Going To Serve Garbage Ice Cream

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By Cooking Panda

If you’ve ever had the pleasure of tasting Salt & Straw’s luxurious frozen treats, chances are you’d never ever turn down ice cream from them — even if it’s trash ice cream.

And that is exactly what they are making. For a limited time, the deities behind the Portland, Oregon-based ice cream will be churning their finest from … garbage.

According to Eater, Salt & Straw, which also has locations in California, is teaming up with Urban Gleaners, a business that redistributes surplus food that is perfectly good but would end up in the trash otherwise.

“We were really struck by the idea that we waste 40 percent of our food in the United States, and that children in our cities are going hungry,” Salt & Straw founder Kim Malek told Fast Company in March. “If we were able to use that food, we could wipe out hunger.”

In June, the West Coast company’s Portland locations will serve up flavors like Urban Gleaners’ Toasted Baguette PB and J, which uses sweet cream, bread extraction, chocolate peanut butter and a swirl of jam made from surplus berries. Other trash flavors include Ancient Heritage’s Lemon Curd and Whey, Celery Root and Strawberry Celery Leaf Jam from Sauvie Island Organics, Breakside Brewery’s Spent Grains and Bacon S’mores and Bourbon Distilled Cherries Ambrosia, the latter of which is vegan.

“We thought: What if we use our menu in June to shine a light on those agencies and tell their story, and see if we can get our customers and the community at large to be more aware of and supportive of these organizations and the work that they’re doing,” Malek told Fast Company. “We want to show that an apple might be kind of ugly, but that doesn’t mean it’s not perfectly tasty and should be thrown away. We could use it.”

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The ice cream makers are hoping to shine a light on the fact that people waste approximately a third of the world’s food. Their project is estimated to save 2,000 pounds of that.

Garbage never tasted so good.

Sources: Eater, Fast Company / Photo Credit: Pexels

Tags: food waste, ice cream, ice cream from trash, salt and straw, sustainable ice cream
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