Organic Water Is A Thing Now Because, Well, We Don’t Know

category:

By Cooking Panda

Americans are becoming increasingly choosier about the fuel they put into their bodies. They want zero added sugar, healthier fats and clean, whole foods. Most recently, they’ve demanded organic water. 

And believe it or not, they got it. 

Asarasi has unveiled the country’s first certified organic H2O, a sparkling beverage filtered straight from trees.

The product boasts mild carbonation and a silky finish on the tongue. Where does this “purest form of water in the world” come from? It’s pulled from the sap of maple trees and filtered until all of the sugar is gone. It is then, of course, carbonated for our enjoyment. One caveat, though: There’s no guarantee that the water going into the maple trees is totally pure.

Maybe you thought non-GMO, untainted water was a given, but this is a nation scarred by the Flint water crisis — so scarred, in fact, that people are willing to shell out $15 a bottle for Asarasi water.

Technically, water shouldn’t even be able to be labeled as organic, according to Grub Street. The USDA says organic foods come from living things, meaning they contain carbon. Water is just a simple combination of hydrogen and oxygen. Asarasi, the clever dogs, fooled the system because their water comes from a tree.

This is proof that Americans are going absolutely nuts for premium water. It’s not enough that the elixir of life be clear and packaged in some kind of bottle; it must sparkle, taste like a tropical fruit but have no calories, come from a nut, be infused with charcoal, or some combination of those criteria. And most recently, it must be organic.

Related  Drinking Too Much Water Could Be Dangerous

That’s no joke. Market research by Mintel shows that a quarter of Americans want organic water, Food Navigator reports. 

Asarasi is the first company to satisfy that need, and as CEO Adam Lazar told Food Navigator, they’re “flying like a bat out of hell.” The bottles will hit 1,500 locations across the country during the summer, and, so far, sales are solid.

Lazar suspects that the water will be a hit not only for people who want to drink it, but for companies who want to cook with it so their products can be 100 percent organic.

“Our goal is to replace what is used as water in the organic food industry,” he told the site.

Feeling a need to cleanse with organic water? Find out where to buy Asarasi here.

Sources: Grub StreetFood Navigator / Photo credit: Myrtle Beach TheDigitel/Flickr

Tags: asarasi, organic, water
related articles